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194X: Architecture, Planning, and Consumer Culture on the American Home Front Libro EPUB, PDF

194X: Architecture, Planning, and Consumer Culture on the American Home Front EPUB PDF por Andrew M. Shanken 978-0816653669, Descargar ebook en línea 194X: Architecture, Planning, and Consumer Culture on the American Home Front Descarga gratuita de Ebook para psp Gratis, lectura gratuita de Ebook 194X: Architecture, Planning, and Consumer Culture on the American Home Front Descarga gratuita de Ebook para psp En línea, en línea, que aquí se puede descargar este libro en formato PDF de forma gratuita y sin la necesidad de gastar dinero extra. Haga clic en el enlace de descarga de abajo para descargar el 194X: Architecture, Planning, and Consumer Culture on the American Home Front PDF gratis.

194X: Architecture, Planning, and Consumer Culture on the American Home Front Descarga gratuita de Ebook para psp
  • Libro de calificación:
    4.11 de 5 (498 votos)
  • Título Original: 194X: Architecture, Planning, and Consumer Culture on the American Home Front
  • Autor del libro: Andrew M. Shanken
  • ISBN: 978-0816653669
  • Idioma: ES
  • Páginas recuento:288
  • Realese fecha:2009-06-24
  • Descargar Formatos: MOBI, ODF, MS WORD, TXT, DJVU, PDF, AZW, PGD
  • Tamaño de Archivo: 14.11 Mb
  • Descargar: 3498
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194X: Architecture, Planning, and Consumer Culture on the American Home Front por Andrew M. Shanken Libro PDF, EPUB

During the Second World War, American architecture was in a state of crisis. The rationing of building materials and restrictions on nonmilitary construction continued the privations that the profession had endured during the Great Depression. At the same time, the dramatic events of the 1930s and 1940s led many architects to believe that their profession-and society itsel During the Second World War, American architecture was in a state of crisis. The rationing of building materials and restrictions on nonmilitary construction continued the privations that the profession had endured during the Great Depression. At the same time, the dramatic events of the 1930s and 1940s led many architects to believe that their profession-and society itself-would undergo a profound shift once the war ended, with private commissions giving way to centrally planned projects. The magazine Architectural Forum coined the term "194X" to encapsulate this wartime vision of postwar architecture and urbanism.